Sunday, 30 November 2014

1. New Season Cranberry Chutney


Cranberry Harvesting, Maine. 1880. J.E.Johnson

This is my favourite Christmas Chutney!   It’s terrific with cold turkey and ham and magnificent with a mature Cheese. My recipe makes up to four jars. Keep three for yourself and give one away as a seasonal gift!                                  
Raw cranberries  are a source of polyphenols which are under active research as anti-cancer agents as well as providing possible benefits to the cardiovascular and immune systems. In the past decade they have also been marketed as a  'superfruit' due to their nutrient content and antioxidant qualities. All cranberries  now come from USA and Canada and have been shipped to England since 1820. Wild cranberries were once picked in Scotland but they are now scarce there due to loss of wetland habitat. 

Ingredients
1kg       Bramley cooking Apples, peeled, cored and chopped small.
500g     Granny Smith or other eating Apples, peeled, cored and chopped.
450g     Onions, sliced.
50g       Fresh Root Ginger, grated.
1 tsp     Black or Szechuan Peppercorns, ground.
1           Red Pepper, deseeded and chopped fine, (add a second if you like a hot chutney).
500g     Fresh Cranberries.
500g     Light brown Muscuvado Sugar.
250ml   Cider Vinegar.
         
Method     Prep: 15 mins. Cook: 1 hr.
 Place all ingredients except the cranberries in a large heavy-based saucepan and heat gently, stirring, until the sugar has dissolved. Bring to the boil, then reduce heat and simmer, uncovered, for about 50 minutes, stirring regularly until the apples and onions are tender and the mixture has thickened.  Add the cranberries, and cook for a approximately 10 minutes until just softened but not burst.  Spoon the hot chutney into sterilised jars, seal and label. Store unopened in a cool, dark place. Chill after opening. Best eaten within 6 months, if you can keep it that long!
                                                                                                     

Food for Thought  There is a great difference between the savage and the civilised man, but it is never apparent to their wives until after breakfast.

Helen Rowland
A Guide to Men